Just like the Spanish Inquisition…

…creativity strikes when you least expect it.

Last night I sat down to read and take notes from Myth and Religion of the North. I ended up getting distracted and spending about an hour knocking out 1,600 words of a story that’s apparently been rattling around in what passes for my brain.

Good distraction!

Why Odin takes warriors

The story began as a bit of dialogue between Odin and an unnamed warrior. I was trying to get into Odin’s head. As I’ve detailed in this blog, Odin favors strong warriors b/c he’s recruiting for the Einherjar–the army of undead men who will fight in Ragnarok against the Jotunn.

From a mortal’s perspective, we can’t explain why anyone is taken before what we might perceive as their time — particularly valiant and heroic warriors. So, wesay a “god” is responsible for the death. (By “we” I mean my conception of what a pagan Norseman might think…which could be totally off base…but that’s the mindset I’m trying to get into)

And, in some cases, Odin’s given the hero a weapon (Sigmund) to use and then Odin causes that weapon to break. Then a valkyr scoops him up and it’s off to Valhol to prepare for Ragnarok. Mortals might call that “betrayed” by Odin.

From (my) Odin’s perspective, though, he doesn’t think of himself as “a liar.” He thinks of himself as a man who will lie if he has to — to get what he wants, protect his people, etc. Not that that’s better, necessarily. He’ll also do other things–whatever it takes–to protect his own.

A little help here?

In my proto-story, Odin lies by omission to the warrior. Odin sees potential in the warrior (but how does he see it? ;)) so he says: “Warrior, I will help you, but you agree to fight for me in my army when you die.”

I’m specifically thinking of Sigmund and the sword Gramr (which means Wrath in Old Norse and is an amazing name for a sword). Odin gave Gramr to Sigmund. And with that sword, Sigmund became a mighty king over the course of many years.

Then a great battle began (read the Volsunga Saga) in which Sigmund, though old, fought so well that none could stand against him…

the battle had dured a while, there came a man into the fight clad in a blue cloak, and with a slouched hat on his head, one-eyed he was,  and bare a bill in his hand; and he came against Sigmund the King, and have up his bill against him, and as Sigmund smote fiercely with the sword it fell upon the bill and burst asunder in the midst: thenceforth the slaughter and dismay turned to his side, for the good-hap of King Sigmund had departed from him, and his men fell fast about him; naught did the king spare himself, but the rather cheered on his men; but even as the saw says, “No might ‘gainst many”, so was it now proven; and in this fight fell Sigmund the King,

Source: http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/vlsng/vlsng13.htm

The man in the blue cloak is Odin; the bare bill is Gungnir. And if I remember correctly, in the Icelandic sagas if a man dons a “blue cloak” (or is seen wearing one) it signifies the intent to murder/kill. (And in the sagas there’s a legal difference between murdering and killing. It’s a murder if you don’t immediately go to the closest homestead and declare in front of witnesses what you did. Murder is despicable; a killing can be totally justified.)

Anyway.

That’s what I had in my head with respect to the help Odin would provide to my unnamed warrior.

My story then evolves from a scrap of dialog in which Odin and the warrior make their bargain to a scene in which the warrior, having died valiantly in battle b/c his sword turns in his hand, is caught up by a valkyr. He then awakens in another place, seemingly healed. He gets up and stumbles into a hall bigger than any he’d ever seen with gold-bright shields hanging from the ceiling.

Hundreds of warriors are in the hall and my unnamed warrior is pushed and shoved through the throng till he staggers out into the clear space before Odin’s throne.

My warrior is angry and confused. He feels betrayed. But one of the warriors around him (an Einherjar) presses a cup of Heidrun’s mead into his hand and whispers to him, “All here have stood where you are now. We all made fools of ourselves before the Valfather. But don’t worry, you’re among brothers.”

Or something along those lines. I forgot what I wrote exactly. There’s more to the story beyond this brief sketch. The POV is the unnamed warrior and he tells his backstory in flashbacks–which totally evolved as I was writing.

Enthusiasms

I’m not sure how “good” my story is or even where it’s headed. I’m just glad I WROTE.

Which then had me wondering about why I’m so blocked with respect to my 2nd book. I’m kinda thinking that I enjoyed, and was spurred on by, the act of making this new story up on the fly. Of discovering the story as I wrote.

With my 2nd book, I outlined the crap out of it. I’m not really able to discover–or I don’t think I’m able to discover–much about it. And when I do discover things I have to make sure they make sense relative to what I’ve already decided. And if the discoveries are better then I have to scrap the older stuff…which causes changes to ripple, etc etc.

Or maybe all of that’s in my head and I’m just making up excuses while shying away from some hard work. And in some ways it’s easier to write a story with nothing tied to it–it’s a lark. But the novel, oooh, that’s important. (Not really, but you know what I mean.) I’m so stressed about making it good that I’m robbing the joy from it.

Either way, the Einherjar story was — and will hopefully continue to be — a fun side project.

Now to re-find the fun in that other story.

 

Less Random Thoughts on Infinity Wars

Stormbreaker belongs to Beta Ray Bill! If he’d had it, then he wouldn’t have been a face on the Grandmaster’s tower!

*ahem* Spoilers.

Full disclosure: I saw all of the following in my first go-round with the movie but elected not to write about them. I thought that maybe I was being hyper-critical. But on the 2nd go-round I was just as annoyed as during the first viewing.

So, here goes.

Thanos

Thanos’s plan is still stupid. In talking to Gamora he says something along the lines of: twenty years ago, I murdered half your planet’s people. Now it’s a paradise.

His next line should be: And I’ll be going back to wipe out another 50% when they start consuming too many resources again.

Or maybe: When I get the 6th McGuffin, I will wipe out 50% of those who remain on your planet which means I won’t have to go back there for a much longer period of time. Gosh, I hope I’m still alive by then!

Or, wait, is Thanos immortal? Gamora should ask: So, Daddy, just how many resources have YOU consumed in your long life? Hmm? What about the planet of the Groot you wiped out to make all that quilty smooth Charmin? We’ll send that old dude from those ancient commercials after you….

And why is it half? Why not kill 80%? 90%? Burn ’em down to minimum viable population? Presumably any of those options would preserve still more resources. But, I guess 50% just rolls off the tongue better.

Gamora and Thanos

Thanos has a spaceship. And a cool teleport power. Why didn’t he and Gamora just teleport to the top of the mountain where the soulstone was kept by Tantalus? Er, Red Skull.

I don’t mind the “must sacrifice something you love” trope, only how dense Gamora was in the moment. For such a savvy character, why didn’t she see it coming?

I get that she doesn’t think Thanos loves anyone so what happens in the movie makes sense from that perspective, but we also know that she loves (and hates) Thanos.

Consider that Tantalus said that to gain the soulstone you had to sacrifice something you love. (Or maybe Tantalus said “what you love most?” I don’t recall exactly.)

Since Gamora loves Thanos and b/c she’s so savvy, what if she was just slightly quicker on the uptake than Thanos and uses that microsecond to try shoving him over the edge? And let’s say she almost gets him, but he uses the power of the McGuffins to screw with reality thus gaining the upper hand and realizing his goal.

Does that rob the scene of weepy Thanos? Or does he remain sad/grieving because he loves Gamora all the more for fighting so damn hard. She is a firecracker, right?

I don’t know if my scenario would’ve worked better or not, but imo its truer to her character than what does transpire. A little tinkering with the prior scenes could’ve set up all of the above.

Thor

As enjoyable as his scenes with the rabbit were, I’m annoyed that he survives the blast of a neutron star but gets his ass kicked by Thanos. Does that mean Thanos is as powerful as a neutron star? Or is the plot convenience more powerful still?

And when the heck did Thor get *that* strong? He got pounded by the Hulk like 5 seconds ago…and Hela….

And did Thanos really leave Thor to die in the purple fire? Really? Why didn’t he wring his neck like Loki? (Who died in a really dumb way.) Moreover, you’re telling me that Thor doesn’t know the difference between a rabbit and raccoon? Really?

And when Thor takes Beta Ray Bill’s rightful weapon, plot-point-dropping Eitri says that the weapon oh-so-conveniently incorporates the power of the Bifrost.

(Many sentences start with “and.”)

So…why does Thor go to Wakanda to battle the zerglings? And, for that matter, how did Thor know to go there?

And if he knew to go to Wakanda, why didn’t he also know to go to Titan to fight Thanos? If he’d gone there, he could’ve gotten the glove off.

Maybe I’m wrong, but it seemed like those two fights were happening at roughly the same time.

The Fight on Titan

Starlord’s “loss of control” when Gamora’s death was revealed to him felt forced either b/c of the acting or the writing or both or b/c the business plan required Thanos to not lose in the first movie.

Wouldn’t it have been cooler if, sure, Starlord goes ballistic but instead says: “Let me help you get that effing glove off so I can kick his ass man to scrotum-chin.”

But b/c Mothra is tickling Thanos’s memories the Mad Titan realizes what’s happening thanks to his grief being so powerful. So Thanos bellows, “Get out of my mind!”, regains his control and beats the piss out of everyone.

But when he says “get out of my mind” he has to say it in the exact same way as the Bene Gesserit Reverend Mother says it to Paul Muad’dib in Dune (the movie).

IMO, you get the same result with my half-assed scenario above w/o the “er, what?” record stop noise.

The Fight in the Blue Bubble of Stargate: Atlantis

And, to wrap up my Negative Nancy-ness, the whole battle scene in Wakanda was just dumb.

They make a big show of forming up ranks only to raggedly charge a force that greatly outnumbers them? That makes no sense to me.

Sure it allows the heroes to have some individual moments but those are yawningly predictable. Guess what, they win!

Why not have the bad guys break the shield wall and the heroes rally the troops to reform the wall. And…spoiler…why didn’t the bad guys just pummel Wakanda from orbit with very small rocks a la The Expanse (and Monty Python).

And, sure, Thor looks cool being the lightning and wielding his now over-sized hammer (Freud much?) but his actions on the battlefield are literally sound and fury signifying…nothing.

Someday, somehow, I will write a book with equally glaring errors and make a similar amount of cash as Infinity War.

Or, maybe I’m just being hyper-critical. After all, the movie was, on the whole, enjoyable.

Thoughts?

Random Thoughts on: Extinction

I’m of course referring to the Netflix movie Extinction not species extinction. But, both are bad.

And I’ve apparently turned into a movie “reviewer” since I stopped writing (again) b/c my family and I moved into a new house. Last. Time. Ever.

What follows might spoil the movie so, if you care, move along…or, because I like Michael Peña, “back it up, just back it up.”

 

Last warning. 🙂

 

So, Extinction was “meh.” The first ~30 minutes were brutally heavy-handed and boring. I contemplated giving up on it, but I literally had nothing better to do and I was hoping that Michael Peña might take it up a notch. But, maybe the script just wasn’t there? Or the directing? I dunno. Either way…. “boh-ring,” as Homer Simpson might say.

Also, Luke Cage was a totally wasted opportunity. Speaking of…I should “review” Season 2 of Luke Cage, which I never finished, because I got bored and tired of all the stupidity in that show. I bailed on Ep 13 (the final episode) b/c I just didn’t care anymore. But, I really like that actor (Mike Colter) so I gritted my teeth for 12 episodes and I suppose I’ll watch #13 eventually. If those Marvel/Netflix shows had fewer episodes I don’t think they’d bog down quite as much.

With respect to Extinction, I was glad I stuck it out b/c of the twist about halfway through. I didn’t see it coming, either because the Hammer of Boring had flattened my brain or (more likely) they successfully pulled a fast one on me. Kudos.

After that twist, I was a little annoyed at some of the trickery that had been used up till that point. Specifically, the cracked space helmet, the way one of the bad guys moved and the look of the space suits themselves.

It was the look of the space suits themselves that I think was most annoying. Felt cheap. And I didn’t buy the (lame) explanation for it.

But, that twist was the movie’s bright spot. And it’s worth thinking about how foreshadowing and twists/reveals can be similarly executed in my own writing. But better, natch. 😉

Random Thoughts on Ant-Man and the Wasp

Now that was a fun movie! I took my kids to see it and we were all laughing. Great action sequences, good acting, fast-paced, clever touches. The animations for the shrinking and growing was impressive. As was how smartly and cleverly Ant-Man and the Wasp use their tech.

NO spoilers ahead.

If at first you don’t succeed…

First off, even though my writer’s block is hanging around smokin cigs and flicking them at me, the writerly part of my brain really appreciated the movie’s use of:

  • try-fail cycles
  • the “yes, but; no, and” technique.

If you don’t know what those are, here’s a good summary. I don’t use either of those techniques half as well as I should. The movie gave me some really concrete examples of how to do it.

As an aside, Ant-Man and the Wasp sounds like an Agatha Christie book…or that Doctor Who episode with Agatha Christie.

Quite the Sting

I enjoyed Evangeline Lily’s performance (I’m not a huge fan, typically). Kudos to her acting and the script. No “damsels in a dress” going on there.

As my daughter put it: “You don’t mess with the girl!”

A Ghost of a Villain

Really interesting how the Ghost played out, at least to my writerly brain. Any guesses as to why?

Also, the decision made by a buddy of the Ghost threw me out of the movie for a bit. But, hey, it was kinda minor.

And as with all Marvel movies, make sure to stick around for at least the first credit scene. The second one…meh.

 

The image is a red panda yawning. I did say my thoughts would be random.

 

Breakthrough?

Bit of a breakthrough this morning. As I think I mentioned in an earlier post, Odin has power over the dead. Hel also has power over the dead. Lots of spoilers for my second book in the stuff that follows. Just saying.

 

Arrr, ye been warned.

 

Who has the powah!

What I’d been having trouble figuring out from a story point of view is why Odin would let Hel gain power over something he controlled. My solution there was to mess with the timing. Odin gained the power first, dropped the ball on paying attention to everything, and that enabled Hel to gain a similar power. But the two of them have different powers over the dead which fits into my narrative.

Another problem I had was regarding a journey Odin (and Frigg) take into the spirit-realm to rescue the spirit of their son Baldr. This is part of the opening scenes of Dark Grows the Sun.

The myths are pretty clear — Hel has Baldr’s spirit and she ain’t giving it back.

Well, why? How did it get to that point?

In my book, Odin (and Frigg) go into the spirit world to get Baldr’s spirit back. They end up having bargain with Hel–which Odin hadn’t expected. He thought it’d be easy peasy.

One problem with this encounter was idiot-plotting. If I put those three at the table, then what would prevent them from hashing out a deal right then and there? (And if they did that, then there’s no story to tell.)

They all have something they want from each other, but Hermod still has to go to Hel and screw up — meaning that Hel keeps Baldr’s spirit — thus thwarting Odin’s (and Frigg’s) goal of bringing him back to life.

For a long time I could not figure out to make that happen without essentially forcing Odin and Hel into fake disagreement that resulted in what I wanted to happen (i.e., idiot plotting).

The opposite of that is creating a situation in which they naturally and believably can’t come to an agreement. Or they come to an agreement neither really likes but can live with (my long-winded way of saying “compromise”). Each of them are interacting in what they perceive to be their own best interests. So they have to do and say things that fit. Otherwise, the scene won’t ring true.

 

The breakthrough! (maybe)

So, I think I just figured it out. At least in the first draft. I deleted about 1500 words doing that, but hey, if they’re shit words then good riddance, right?

I’ll see how well this scene actually works tomorrow morning, but I think it’s 75% there.

Well, I hope it is.

And in fixing this stuff at the beginning, then future scenes should be more stable — even if I have to scrap and rewrite them — because then the foundation will be more stable.

Random Thoughts on Infinity Wars

My son and I finally saw Avengers: Infinity Wars this past weekend. Fun movie. The following contains spoilers…and a few thoughts on the flick.

Thanos

He was done pretty well, both on the CGI and Brolin’s acting. Better than I expected, frankly. And having read Jim Starlin’s original Adam Warlock series years and years ago I was prepared to be disappointed.

But I gotta say, the Mad Titan’s rationale for wiping out half the universe was cooler in that old comic. Essentially, he did it b/c he was wooing Death. Based on this, it makes total sense as to why the movie’s creators didn’t run with Starlin’s original plot.

Nidavellir

In Norse myth, Nidavellir is one of the names for the home of the Svartalfar. The other is Svartalfheim. Nidavellir means the “low fields” or “dark fields.” See this site for more info.

In the movie, Nidavellir is both the home of the MCU’s giant dwarves and the forge where Mjolnir and now Stormbreaker were made. It was clever having the forge be a neutron star, but less so to have Tyrion Lanister play Eitri. (Though it was funny to have him be gigantic.)

Thor and Stormbreaker

First, Stormbreaker belongs to Beta Ray Bill!, Second, these dudes make a real Stormbreaker. If you’ve never watched Man at Arms Reforged then you’re missing out. Forged in Fire is good, too. I’ve learned quite a bit about blacksmithing and forging from those shows — enough to improve my fictional scenes that incorporate that stuff.

Eitri, Brokk and Sindri

The movie only includes Eitri, but there are other “dwarves” in Norse myth — there’s a long list of them in Voluspa (if memory serves). Two of the other important “dwarf” names are Sindri and Brokkr. All three are part of a myth that Snorri relates in the Prose Edda that deals with:

  • Loki cutting off Sif’s hair and getting forced to replace it
  • Loki wagering his head against the dwarves’ craftsmanship. Loki loses the bet, but through quick thinking keeps his head — only to get his mouth sewed shut. It’s a cool little tale.

The Svartalvar are heavily referenced in my first two books, they make an appearance in a “flashback” sequence (Kinsmen Die) and then directly appear in Book 3 (BK3). The Svartalvar are integral to the “mysterious device” plot arc that I introduced in Kinsmen Die.

And with that said, a future series that I’ve partially written (originally it was woven into the series I’m writing now) Eitri, Brokk and Sindri are three brothers who are “of the line of Sindri.”  That original Svartalvar is the one who forged/crafted the items used by the Aesir (as part of Loki’s wager) — Mjolnir, Gungnir, Draupnir, etc.

At the moment my Svartalvar are more like elves than dwarves, though I tried (and will continue trying) to avoid the Tolkien elf trope. Which is really a Svartalfar trope. Kinda.

That future series is equal parts prequel, contemporaneous and sequel to my current series. It’ll be fun pulling all the various threads together especially since I lose track of quite a few them until they reappear again…right before Ragnarok.

 

 

 

 

 

The Untrustworthy Odin

As I’ve mentioned before, the Odin of myth is very different than how he’s portrayed in the Marvel universe — which is fine, of course.

Dr. Karl Siegfried provides an excellent summary and analysis of the first Thor movie and how it both draws on and diverges from Norse myth. Find it here.

In this post, I provide a short summary of how Odin acquires the mead of poetry — a topic I slightly touched on here.

Summary of the Myth

In his Skaldskaparmal (Prose Edda), Snorri relates the tale of how the mead of poetry was hidden away by the giant Suttung who then set his daughter, Gunnloth, to guard it.

Odin wanted the mead so he went to the place where Suttung and his brother Baugi lived. Baugi’s nine workmen were out reaping. Disguised, Odin offered to sharpen the scythes of the workmen with a fancy honing stone. They agreed and, blades sharpened, recommenced cutting.

The scythes cut so well they asked if Odin would sell them the honing stone. He agreed and set a high price on it. All the giants wanted it, so Odin threw it up in the air and the giants in their desire for the stone killed each other.

Workmen dispatched, Odin went to Baugi’s hall where he found Baugi lamenting over his lack of workmen. Odin, naming himself Bolverk (Evil Doer), said he would do the work of all nine men. But he wanted recompense equal to his labor — a drink from the mead of poetry. Baugi said sure, but that he didn’t have control over the mead but knew where it was.

Odin gets to the mead by boring through rock to the chamber in which Gunnloth guards the mead. He seduces her and over three consecutive nights, drinks all the mead. Then he escapes, transforms into an eagle and flies back to Asgard.

In this last paragraph, I’ve combined Snorri’s account with the one in the Havamal. They differ somewhat in the details.

In the Havamal, Odin says that the giants then went to Asgard and asked if one named Bolverk was among them. Odin says no and, presumably, the giants mosey on back to Jotunheim.

And from the Havamal….

Stanza 110 in the Havamal reads (quoted from Bellows translation here):

On his ring swore Othin | the oath, methinks;
Who now his troth shall trust?
Suttung’s betrayal | he sought with drink,
And Gunnloth to grief he left.

The translator notes in this version of the Poetic Edda read: “Othin is keenly conscious of having violated the most sacred of oaths, that sworn on his ring.”

Dr. Jackson Crawford translates the Havamal (and the Poetic Edda) into more modern-day English. Here are a few examples of how Odin is aware of his “evil-doing” nature (the numbers refer to the stanzas):

  • 104: Referring to Gunnloth, Odin says, “I would later giver her a bad repayment for her trusting mind…”
  • 107: “I made good use of the disguise I used; few things are too difficult for the wise.”
  • 108: “I doubt I could have escaped…if I hadn’t used Gunnloth…”
  • 110: “I believe that Odin swore an oath to them — but who can trust Odin?”

So, Odin is….

I condense and relate all the above to show how Odin:

  • Disguises himself and lies.
  • Seduces and betrays.
  • Is totally aware of what he’s doing.

The mead of poetry myth also shows how Odin does all of the above to achieve his own ends. This is consistent with how he instigates war among men so that he can harvest the best warriors to fight on behalf of the gods and men at Ragnarok. More on this in a future post.

Dark Grows the Sun

Here’s the cover of my second book, Dark Grows the Sun. It’ll be published in about a year.

That’s Odin. Those are the Norns. Or were, at least. As I’ve mentioned before, my Odin is in the process of becoming the one recorded in our myths — or my interpretation of him, at least.

He’s not a kindly, wise, white-bearded old man who fades into golden sparkles on the wind. He’s got a brutal streak a mile wide. He can leap about |——| … and he has nasty, big, pointy — oh…wait…that’s something else entirely.

But, back to the cover. A few of those who I’d asked to provide their input on it had some reservations and pointed out some technical and consistency issues with respect to the art of Kinsmen Die.

And while I shared some of those reservations, here are a few reasons I went forward with this design:

  1. I liked it.
  2. The image is pretty powerful for multiple reasons. I’ll leave it at that 🙂
  3. I gave the artist several summaries of important scenes in the book. He chose this one and illustrated it. Even the first iteration was spot on to what happens in the book. If that was something that caught his imagination then maybe there’s merit in letting it ride — wasn’t like I had any better ideas at the time (or now, even).

I also had another reason for going with a different-looking cover:

  1. Sales of my first book are non-existent. Not unexpected but still disheartening.
    1. As an aside, a good friend of mine recently asked a pretty well-known author to provide some encouraging words to me since, as this blog shows, I’ve got a solid case of writer’s block.
    2. That author said that my writer’s block is because of those crappy book sales and that I needed to get over it. He’s right. And I’m working on it. Slowly.
  2. Why are sales of KD sales non-existent? A couple reasons, methinks:
    1. Nobody knows it exists
    2. People stumble across it and either:
      1. Aren’t drawn in by the cover
      2. Like the cover but don’t like the blurb
      3. Don’t like the whole thing.
  3. How can I can address these issues?
    1. Advertising and marketing
    2. Change the cover
    3. Change the blurb

I’ve experimented with advertising & marketing. Mediocre results likely due to it requiring a different skillset and more dedication than I have capacity for right now. I need to get more books written first.

I’m not spending the cash to change the cover of KD b/c I don’t know if that’s the issue. I’m not even reasonably certain that’s the issue. I’ve also changed the blurb a bit. But again, I don’t know where the problem is.

So, I’m going with a different cover approach on DGtS. People. Lighter. Maybe that will draw folks in. We shall see. In like a year, lol.

The main problem is awareness. And while it’d be great to invest the time and money into building awareness, I only have one book to monetize. The good folks over at the Sci-Fi and Fantasy Marketing podcast have consistently recommended:

  1. Launching an entire series at once so you have more books. Awesome if you can do it. I can’t.
  2. Marketing when you have more books b/c you can do things like “first book free” in order to generate sales of other books in the series…which I don’t have.

I tend to think they’re right.

And, this is the series I want to write. I have zero ideas for stuff outside of this Norse-inspired universe that’s rattling around in my head. Those future stories are pretty cool (imo, lol), but I’m not ready for ’em yet. Gotta get thru this 2nd book. Maybe then I jump ahead and write ’em…or maybe I stick to the plan and write book three in this series.

Dunno yet.

For now, I gotta work thru this writer’s block.

Struggling.

Not much else to say. I sit down to write and my mind slides off the project like a dull knife off ice.

As an example, last week I wrote in my notebook a summary of each scene in the arcs for Loki, Frigg and Odin. I was trying to reinvigorate my interest by refreshing my memory — and, in the process, maybe spot some problems I could fix. It was helpful.

But now, because we’re selling our house and had to declutter, I shoved that notebook somewhere and can’t find it. Sigh.

So, as I sit down this morning to write, I’m annoyed and uninterested in working on Dark Grows the Sun — so many places that need work that I don’t know where to start.

So, I opened ancient drafts that I last looked at in September 2015. That felt like less of a total time-waster. (Self delusion is fun.)

When I originally started writing, all of what I’m working on now was a great big mish-mash. Over time, I broke that mess into three “volumes”:

  1. Aesir, which further divides into my current projects:
    1. Kinsmen Die
    2. Dark Grows the Sun
    3. I Don’t Know Yet
  2. Svartalvar
  3. Humanity

My original idea was to have Aesir #3 blend into the first Svartalvar book. Those of you who’ve read Kinsmen Die know that the Svartalvar have been mentioned numerous times but only seen once. The same goes for Dark Grows the Sun…except for one scene in which Odin sits upon the High Seat and looks down upon those “dark alvar.” As its written right now, Odin is the link between the two volumes.

Volume 2 dives right into the Svartalvar world via three characters: Sindri, Brokk and Eitri. Those familiar with Norse myth will recognize those names. They are the three “dwarves” who forged the weapons and items used by the Aesir — Gungnir, Mjolnir, etc.

Of course my three dudes are not those three dudes. Those names became titles/office which my three hold. As currently written. That may change if I decide that’s too stupid.

The goal of Volume 2 was to pick up at a point in Svartalvar history at which Sindri had discovered something amazing and then, through a series of accidents, come into contact with the Jotunn — specifically, Vafthrudnir. All of this is both the “prequel” to Kinsmen Die as well as running concurrently with the events in the Aesir volume. Book Two of Svartalvar is probably where they’ll link.

My goal with the third volume, Humanity, was to drag people into the Svartalvar world via Sindri and his experiments. That basic idea still works despite some changes I’ve made to how the universe is built.

The Humanity volume centers around a boy (Rowan) and a young female fox (Brinn). It’s in this volume that humans (via Rowan) come into direct contact with the Aesir. And its where Vidar starts to become a whole lot more like Odin. (Vidar was my gateway back into Norse myths and the dude around which everything initially revolved.) Oh, and those of you who know Norse myth know how important the rowan tree is 🙂

Looking back at it now, “Humanity” is very young adult (not that there’s anything wrong with that) and very quest oriented…which I had major problems with because I poorly used the “MacGuffin” technique.

Overall, there’s some really cool material in those later volumes which I’m eager to get to. It’s also nice to see that my writing has gotten better.

But as I sit here languishing in the mire that Dark Grows the Sun has become, I wonder when I’ll ever get to that material. And it’s depressing. I need Westley to dive into the lightning sand and haul my ass out. But, sadly, I am my own Buttercup and my own Westley.

Delayed!

I’ve pushed the publication of my second book back by about a year. Few reasons for that:

  • Lot of stuff happening with my family; that’s more important
  • Feeling rushed. There’s working under pressure and producing a good product for your editor to read and then there’s just slapping words on the page, knowing they suck. The latter just wastes her time and my money.
  • Troubles with theme and timelines.

Timelines will be the death of me. I’m continually struggling over making sure everyone is where they should be WHEN they should be and that it took a reasonable amount of time for them to get there. I’ll think I have it fixed only to start writing another scene and I’ll realize things are out of whack. And once you move one event, the changes ripple.

Theme. Ah, theme. I have three intertwined plots in my 2nd book: Loki, Frigg and Odin. They’re all twined around the…spoiler!

…spoiler!

…srsly…this next bit is a spoiler…

 

 

…the death of Baldr. Which is probably not a huge shock to those who know Norse myths. Odin’s plot is the most important one. Here’s what my editor said about it when she read my outline & summary…

Odin’s transformation has the potential to be monumental. His storyline is so much more internal than the others that it almost feels quiet in comparison, yet it sets the tone for everything.

What I have right now is nowhere near that. And I need it to deliver.

I need it.

So that’s why I’ve delayed the book.